Date: October 19, 2017
Filed in: frontpage, dossiers

Fog of CryptoWar

The Fog of Cryptowar - Why it’s not about crypto regulation. Over the last two years, politicians in the USA, UK and elsewhere have been threatening the regulation of strong cryptography. But the experts and journalists who have expressed concern over this have done so in ways that we consider misleading. In this document we will recap the motives and strategies of the people who wish to regulate cryptography, the responses by its defenders and the battle over public opinion.

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Date: October 07, 2013
Filed in: dossiers, frontpage, opinion

Tracking the Silk Road - Lessons for darknet services

On Oct 2nd 2013, a person was arrested in San Francisco (CA USA) who allegedly operated the darknet marketplace website “The Silk Road”. Shortly after, the Silk Road went offline.

Within minutes discussions on the Internet sprung up with thousands of people trying to cope with their loss, trying to make sense of what happened. Several “official” documents (a criminal complaint and an indictment) were released shortly after which, in turn, lead to commentators rushing to explain what stupid mistakes DPR – the Silk Road operator – had committed. Now, after a few days have passed, I’d like to give analysis a try myself.

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Date: February 07, 2013
Filed in: announcements, frontpage

Reaching us 24/7

Over the last few days our incoming gateways have been the target of a DDoS attack.However, we remain reachable anyways via the Tor and I2P darknets: Tor:shadow7jnzxjkvpz.onion (or via shadow7jnzxjkvpz.tor2web.org if you have no Tor installed). I2P: jme44x4m5k3ikzwk3sopi6huyp5qsqzr27plno2ds65cl4nv2b4a.b32.i2p (or via jme44x4m5k3ikzwk3sopi6huyp5qsqzr27plno2ds65cl4nv2b4a.b32.i2p.in if you don’t have I2P yourself). alternatively: shadowlife.i2p (or shadowlife.i2p.us or shadowlife.i2p.in or shadowlife.i2p.to if you do not have I2P running)
Date: December 06, 2012
Filed in: frontpage, news

News: Automated passport checks to be extended in Germany

The interior ministry of Germany announced that automated passport checks are to be extended to more airports

  • The system to be used is the EasyPass Gates system.
  • Travelers are automatically checked for height and a picture of their face is taken.
  • The picture then is checked against the electronic record stored in the passport, comparing the biometric features.
  • On biometric match, the passenger may pass without further contact with the border agents.
  • The core technologies used are biometric facial recognition and RFID of the passport.
  • No previous individual enrollment of the passenger is required.
  • After the system has been used in Frankfurt am Main, the airports of Hamburg, Berlin and Duesseldorf are to be added to the program.
  • The EasyPass system was developed by L1 Identity Solutions which is now part of Morpho, a subsidiary of the Safran S.A, a french multinational defense and aircraft technology provider.

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Date: December 01, 2012
Filed in: concepts, frontpage

No place to hide. Anonymity - Online and Offline - Part III

In this article we are going to explore how anonymity in the physical world is eroded through technologies and conventions that have been introduced over the last 30 years. Most people assume that their physical behavior is mostly disconnected from the world of bits and bytes, databases and surveillance (see part I on the Theory of Anonymity, and part II about Online Anonymity). Sadly, this increasingly proves to be an illusion.

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Date: November 24, 2012
Filed in: frontpage, news

News: Salt Lake City police about to adopt head cameras

The police chief in Salt Lake City, Utah, wants to make head cameras mandatory at his police department:

  • This US police force wants to clip cameras on the side of all their officers’ heads via glasses, helmets or hats.
  • The head cameras can record a crime scene or any interaction with the public, in addition to the footage already produced by dashboard cameras in their cars.
  • Supporters of the technology claim that the head cameras are made in such a way that officers cannot edit the footage, helping to ensure transparency.
  • The AXON Flex devices considered in Utah are manufactured by US firm TASER (they are an upgrade of the earlier AXON Pro system).
  • Currently, there are 274 US law enforcement agencies using one or both version (some for all officers, others are just testing a few).
  • UK police forces are also testing similar technology.
  • For example, Grampian Police officers in Aberdeen have been using body cameras which attach to their helmets and vests since 2010.

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Date: November 24, 2012
Filed in: frontpage, news

News: Bill to authorizes warrantless access to Americans's email

A vote on a bill which authorizes warrantless access to American’s email is scheduled for next week:

  • A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans’ email privacy has been rewritten to give government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law.
  • It would allow more than 22 agencies (including the SEC and the FCC) to access Americans’ email, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter direct messages without a warrant.
  • In some circumstances the FBI and DHS could get full access to Internet accounts without notifying the owner or a judge.
  • This is a setback for Internet companies, which want to convince Congress to update the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act to protect documents stored in the cloud.
  • Currently Internet users enjoy more privacy rights for data stored on hard drives than for data stored in the cloud.

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Date: November 20, 2012
Filed in: frontpage, news

News: UK plans to block online porn for minors

UK government is moving forward with its plans to block online porn for minors:

  • Anyone buying a new computer or signing up with a new Internet service provider (ISP) will be asked whether they have children on first login.
  • On ‘yes‘ further questions will be asked to determine the stringency of the anti-pornography filters which will be installed.
  • ISPs have to impose appropriate measures to ensure that those setting the parental controls are over 18.
  • ISPs also have to prompt existing customers to install the filters.
  • This plan differs from earlier opt-out plans which would have blocked online porn automatically.
  • The Open Rights Group consider this ‘active choice’ proposal to be better than the earlier opt-out plans.

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