Date: October 19, 2017
Filed in: frontpage, dossiers

Fog of CryptoWar

The Fog of Cryptowar - Why it’s not about crypto regulation. Over the last two years, politicians in the USA, UK and elsewhere have been threatening the regulation of strong cryptography. But the experts and journalists who have expressed concern over this have done so in ways that we consider misleading. In this document we will recap the motives and strategies of the people who wish to regulate cryptography, the responses by its defenders and the battle over public opinion.

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Date: October 07, 2013
Filed in: dossiers, frontpage, opinion

Tracking the Silk Road - Lessons for darknet services

On Oct 2nd 2013, a person was arrested in San Francisco (CA USA) who allegedly operated the darknet marketplace website “The Silk Road”. Shortly after, the Silk Road went offline.

Within minutes discussions on the Internet sprung up with thousands of people trying to cope with their loss, trying to make sense of what happened. Several “official” documents (a criminal complaint and an indictment) were released shortly after which, in turn, lead to commentators rushing to explain what stupid mistakes DPR – the Silk Road operator – had committed. Now, after a few days have passed, I’d like to give analysis a try myself.

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Date: November 24, 2012
Filed in: frontpage, news

News: Salt Lake City police about to adopt head cameras

The police chief in Salt Lake City, Utah, wants to make head cameras mandatory at his police department:

  • This US police force wants to clip cameras on the side of all their officers’ heads via glasses, helmets or hats.
  • The head cameras can record a crime scene or any interaction with the public, in addition to the footage already produced by dashboard cameras in their cars.
  • Supporters of the technology claim that the head cameras are made in such a way that officers cannot edit the footage, helping to ensure transparency.
  • The AXON Flex devices considered in Utah are manufactured by US firm TASER (they are an upgrade of the earlier AXON Pro system).
  • Currently, there are 274 US law enforcement agencies using one or both version (some for all officers, others are just testing a few).
  • UK police forces are also testing similar technology.
  • For example, Grampian Police officers in Aberdeen have been using body cameras which attach to their helmets and vests since 2010.

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Date: November 24, 2012
Filed in: frontpage, news

News: Bill to authorizes warrantless access to Americans's email

A vote on a bill which authorizes warrantless access to American’s email is scheduled for next week:

  • A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans’ email privacy has been rewritten to give government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law.
  • It would allow more than 22 agencies (including the SEC and the FCC) to access Americans’ email, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter direct messages without a warrant.
  • In some circumstances the FBI and DHS could get full access to Internet accounts without notifying the owner or a judge.
  • This is a setback for Internet companies, which want to convince Congress to update the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act to protect documents stored in the cloud.
  • Currently Internet users enjoy more privacy rights for data stored on hard drives than for data stored in the cloud.

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Date: November 05, 2012
Filed in: concepts, frontpage, opinion

Global Spying: Realistic Probabilities In Modern Signals Intelligence

A paper on the probabilities of global internet surviellance, presented in 2010 at the Defcon conference in Las Vegas, proving to be close to what becomes common knowledge today.

In this article, we will present insight to the realistic possibilities of Internet mass surveillance. When talking about the threat of Internet surveillance, the common argument is that there is so much traffic that any one conversation or email won’t be picked up unless  there is reason to suspect those concerned; it is impossible that “they” can listen to us all.

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